The View from IC Newsletter

If you’re not already part of our IC community, please subscribe here.

 

What's in this issue                    
1. Knowledge-rich Skills Key for Effective ASL-English Interpretations (English)
2. From our catalogue: Interpretation Skills: ASL to English (English)
3. Deafblind Awareness Month (English)
4. Out There: Off-The-Grid Missions (English)
5. Daily Government Briefings Now Interpreted (ASL and English)
6. The IC Book Club: Sigh, Gone: A Misfit's Memoir of Great Books, Punk Rock and the Fight to Fit In by Phuc Tran (English)
7. English Oddities (ASL and English)


Not signed up for our newsletter?
Subscribe
 

Knowledge-rich skills key for

effective ASL-English interpretations

 
The skills and experience of interpreters affect the quality of interpretations from ASL to English. Expert interpreters have more experience in the profession and tend to be more competent in both languages, English and ASL. However, both experts and novices may have some difficulty with either or both languages. Errors made may skew the message and render parts of the interpretation ineffective.

Dr. Marty Taylor's research in her book Interpretation Skills: ASL to English shows that effective interpretations require interpreters to have full competence in fundamental knowledge-lean skills before they can master the more complex and nuanced knowledge-rich skills. It is only with mastery of knowledge-rich skills that interpreters can convey the subtle differences in meaning and tone that a signer is expressing.

Read the full article on our blog.
 
- From our catalogue -
 

“Giving voice” to a signer’s discourse calls on a whole family of skills — but exactly what are they? Essential skills must be clearly defined for students as well as practitioners to become more accurate and more eloquent interpreters.

For more than 30 years, Dr. Marty Taylor has researched interpretation. In this book she analyzes the specific skills needed to convey ASL to English and describes the key elements of accurate and eloquent interpretation of a signer’s message into English. Forty-one (41) distinct skills are identified and carefully defined, along with full descriptions of the interpretation errors that commonly occur when any particular skill is missing.

The book steps readers through a logical path of skill development. It is an excellent resource to use with its companion book Interpretation Skills: English to ASL 2nd Edition and the Pursuit of ASL video series.

Interpretation Skills: ASL to English catalogue page
 
JUNE is Deafblind Awareness Month
Around the globe, yarn bombing will happen in June to raise deafblind awareness. What is yarn bombing? It's street art where yarn is knitted or crocheted and wrapped around an object in a public space. And it's tactile.

Each art installation will be constructed by people with deafblindness, their families and loved ones, advocates, Human support services/ Interpreter-guides/ Deafblind interpretation services/ Intervenors/  Support Service Providers, and others in the field. Every stitch will celebrate people coming together to create awareness of deafblindness.

In the province of Ontario this will happen on June 30. Check to see if there is an event in your part of the world!


Deafblind International https://www.deafblindinternational.org/get-involved-old/yarn-bombing-2021/
 
- Out There -

Off-The-Grid Missions
Our feature this month is Off-The-Grid Missions (OTGM), a Non-Profit Organization founded in 2009 by Angela Maria Nardolillo, a hard of hearing person.  

Angela traveled the world for years, interacting with isolated Deaf Communities and witnessing the limited access to communication and education, as well as the deprivation of language.

Her efforts have created a global movement, working towards a common goal of "bringing light to the source of the problem in order to disarm it with tangible and sustainable solutions."

Each mission focuses on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Relief to Deaf communities in high-risk and remote regions around the world. 

Check out their website to learn more and how you can help too!

https://www.offthegridmissions.org/
 
OTGM provided Disaster Relief in 2019 after Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas.
 
The View from IC is interested in featuring Canadian and American businesses and organizations owned/created/operated by Deaf or hard of hearing persons. Recommendations? Let us know.

Or, if you are involved in one of these businesses or organizations and would appreciate some FREE promotion in Out There in a future issue, fill out our form here. Kat will be in touch!
 
Daily US government briefings

now interpreted,

but access limited
In Canada and the United States, sign language interpreters were called upon early in the pandemic to get the daily government messages about COVID-19 out to the Deaf community.

Although this access was welcomed, it highlights the inequities in access to essential communication that exist daily for Deaf and hard of hearing individuals. Access to sign language interpreters for other government press conferences did not happen.

However, there has been encouraging progress in the United States. On January 25, 2021, the Biden administration announced that White House daily press briefings would include a sign language interpreter.

This new policy goes far beyond providing ASL interpretation for COVID information - it is now made available for briefings on ALL topics.

For President Biden's first address to Congress at the end of April, the White House provided a feed of the ASL interpreter for the TV networks. This was the first time in US history that this had been provided. Unfortunately, none of the networks broadcast the feed; only CBS carried it on its website. Those without high speed internet had no options to access the address.

In future, NAD encourages all TV networks to broadcast the ASL interpreter feed so people can access it in an appropriately sized picture-in-picture (PIP) inset. If you are a Deaf or hard of hearing individual who has experienced difficulties with access to these government broadcasts, contact your local TV station and let them know that broadcasting accurate captioning and the ASL interpreter feed is essential.

Read the full article and find a list of network contact emails on our blog.

Sources:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/asl-interpreter-covid-briefing-1.5894332

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/26/us/politics/asl-interpreters-white-house-briefings.html

https://www.nad.org/2021/04/29/tv-networks-please-carry-the-asl-interpreter-feed/
Howard Rosenblum, CEO of NAD since April 2011, urges TV networks to carry the ASL Interpreter on the feed as well. 
 
 *** The IC Book Club ***
Every month The IC Book Club presents a book that gives us an opportunity to learn about others' lived experiences and widen our perspectives.

In honor of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we present Phuc Tran's memoir of growing up as a refugee in small town America.

Here's what Goodreads has to say about Sigh, Gone:

For anyone who has ever felt like they don't belong, Sigh, Gone shares an irreverent, funny, and moving tale of displacement and assimilation woven together with poignant themes from beloved works of classic literature.

In 1975, during the fall of Saigon, Phuc Tran immigrates to America along with his family. By sheer chance they land in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, a small town where the Trans struggle to assimilate into their new life. In this coming-of-age memoir told through the themes of great books such as The Metamorphosis, The Scarlet Letter, The Iliad, and more, Tran navigates the push and pull of finding and accepting himself despite the challenges of immigration, feelings of isolation, and teenage rebellion, all while attempting to meet the rigid expectations set by his immigrant parents.

For more info about the book, check these links:


NPR's review of Sigh, Gone

Macmillan Publishers' page for Sigh, Gone
 
Our English oddity for May: 

Why is it called the 'original' copy?
Angela Petrone Stratiy in ASL.
Description: Angela wearing a dark shirt sits in front of a dark blue background.
Another oddity revealed in June!
Angela will explain another oddity in ASL next month.
 
Mother's Day was May 9th, but let's make May Mom's Month.

Sending best wishes to all moms!
Interpreting Consolidated (IC) publishes resources for ASL and interpreting students, interpreters, educators and mentors in the US and Canada.
 
We send out The View from IC monthly.

Questions? Have an idea for a resource you'd like to see? Just want to say hello? Get in touch with Kat Vickers, Marketing and Distribution Manager. Or just reply to this email! The address will look weird, but it will get to us.

If you're not already part of our IC community, please subscribe here.

Thanks for reading!

 

What's in this issue                      
1. Choosing an Interpreter Education Program (English)
2. From our catalogue: Complexities in Educational Interpreting (English)
3. Signed Music - Rhythm of the Heart (ASL and English)
4. Sound of Metal movie (English)
5. Out There: SAYBB Creations Beadwork (English)
6. The IC Book Club: Can Bears Ski? by Raymond Antrobus and Polly Dunbar (British Sign Language and English)
7. English Oddities (ASL and English)

 
 

Choosing an IEP 

Accredited? Field experience? Certified interpreters? 

What other questions should you ask?

 
So, you’re fluent in ASL, and you want to learn to become an interpreter. How do you decide where to apply? There are many interpreter education programs (IEPs) at colleges and universities across the United States and in Canada.

One consideration may be whether the IEP is an accredited program. CCIE (Commission on Collegiate Interpreter Education) is an independent agency. It is the only recognized body that accredits IEPs in the US and Canada.

CCIE has 10 areas in which a program must meet standards of quality in order to be accredited. To maintain accreditation, reviews occur every two years, and after ten years, a complete program review is conducted.

For more information about these standards and a list of accredited programs, go to http://www.ccie-accreditation.org.
The CCIE accreditation process ensures that an institution’s interpreter education program meets defined quality standards. It does not compare or rank accredited programs.

It is  important to note that curricula vary from program to program, so it is worthwhile to do your research to ensure that the program encompasses all the necessary components needed to become a successful interpreter.

Here are some questions that prospective students can ask when considering enrollment in an IEP:
  1. Is this program accredited by the CCIE? If not, why not?
  2. Do you have a practicum or internship component in your IEP? If so, how many hours are required and what does it entail?
  3. Are your faculty members certified sign language interpreters?
  4. What kind of facilities do you have available to students? A visual language lab? Classrooms and class sizes? Resources?
  5. Does this program focus on one specialty of sign language interpreting? Educational interpreting? Community interpreting?
  6. Does this program teach Deaf culture? ASL skills are only part of the picture in becoming a successful interpreter.
  7. Are there opportunities for becoming involved in the local Deaf community?
  8. Do you teach classes on ethical decision making?
Doing as much research as possible before you enroll goes a long way in preparing the path to your ultimate goal of becoming a certified interpreter.

Read our full blog post here.
 
- From our catalogue -
 
The University of Northern Colorado Department of ASL & Interpreting Studies conducted a five-year Patterns of Practice Investigation into educational interpreting practices in the United States.

If you are concerned about equal communication access for K-12 students who are deaf and hard of hearing, this book is for you.

In addition to reporting the findings from the investigation, it also includes:
  • - Answers to 10 important questions about educational interpreting services that are needed to ensure a free appropriate public education for K-12 students who are deaf and hard of hearing
  • - Significant events that occurred after the completion of the five-year investigation
  • - Recommendations for agencies and professional organizations
  • - Recommendations of professional standards for educational interpreters.
Complexities in Educational Interpreting catalogue page
 
Signed Music Rhythm of the Heart
Signed Music has arisen from within Deaf culture as a visual performance form involving sign language, rhythm, dance and multimedia. Ella Lentz, Pamela Witcher, Yan Liu and Janis Cripps perform and explain their perceptions of signed music.
Produced by Canadian Cultural Society for the Deaf (2015)
 
The movie Sound of Metal by writer/director Darius Marder is the story of Ruben, a punk metal drummer who is losing his hearing. It has been nominated for six Oscars - Best Picture, Best Actor - Riz Ahmed, Best Supporting Actor - Paul Raci, Best Original Screenplay, Best Film Editing and Best Sound.

Reaction in the Deaf community has been mixed as lead actor Riz Ahmed is hearing. Director Darius Marder felt that the actor playing Ruben had to be hearing to accurately portray the situation he is thrust into. Marder however made it very clear that Deaf roles in the film had to be played by actors who are Deaf or from Deaf culture.

For more on the film, check out the links below. Sound of Metal is available on Amazon Prime in the US and on Apple TV/Google Play in Canada.

Sources:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/entertainment/sound-of-metal-deaf-actors-1.5833356
https://disabilityhorizons.com/2021/02/sound-of-metal-a-film-criticised-for-its-representation-of-hearing-loss-to-a-hearing-audience/
https://www.npr.org/2020/12/04/940810758/in-sound-of-metal-sudden-hearing-loss-sends-a-drummer-reeling
 
- Out There -

SAYBB Creations Beadwork
Our small business feature this month is SAYBB Creations Beadwork with Sarah A. Young Bear-Brown, a Meskwaki Deaf Artist and fifth generation beadworker.

Sarah is skilled at balancing many responsibilities in addition to her beadwork.

As a mother of two, Sarah is also an advocate for the Indigenous Deaf Community, often sharing her experience and knowledge at rallies in the Washington DC area.  She strongly opposed the Dakota Access Pipeline and was an activist who gathered near the Standing Rock reservation in 2016 to protest.  

She is a founder of "Gathering of Deafatives": events to inform the Native American Deaf Community. 

Additionally, Sarah is Vice Chair for Native American Caucus for Iowa Democratic Party, a member of the Deaf Poor People's Campaign, Vice President of the Cedar Rapids Association of the Deaf and on the board for OPE! PAC.  

Follow her on Instagram @saybb_creations_beadwork. 

Join her through Zoom on April 22, 2021: 
 
The View from IC is interested in featuring Canadian and American businesses and organizations owned/created/operated by Deaf or hard of hearing persons. Recommendations? Let us know.

Or, if you are involved in one of these businesses or organizations and would appreciate some FREE promotion in Out There in a future issue, fill out our form here. Kat will be in touch!
 
 *** The IC Book Club ***
Every month The IC Book Club presents a book that gives us an opportunity to learn about others' lived experiences and widen our perspectives.

Award-winning Jamaican-British poet Raymond Antrobus has published his first book for children - Can Bears Ski? - after being unable to find any kids' titles with a central character who is Deaf. The book is illustrated by Polly Dunbar. It is a 2021 Ezra Jack Keats honoree winner.

Little Bear feels the world around him. He feels his bed rumble when Dad Bear wakes him up in the morning. He feels the floor shake when his teacher stomps to get his attention. But something else is missing, like when his friends tell jokes that he isn’t sure he understands, or when all around him Little Bear hears the question, “Can bears ski?” Then, one day, Dad Bear takes him to see an “aud-i-olo-gist,” and Little Bear learns that he has been experiencing deafness and will start wearing hearing aids. Soon he figures out what that puzzling refrain is: “Can you hear me?” Little Bear’s new world is LOUD and will take some getting used to, but with the love and support of Dad Bear, he will find his way.

What Kirkus Reviews says about Can Bears Ski? -
As with many picture books addressing specific issues, the main audience for this book will be children with a similar experience, who will surely delight in seeing the little bear wearing his hearing aids and learning to navigate the world. However, all young readers will enjoy figuring out just what “Can bears ski?” is supposed to mean and will benefit from learning about being hard of hearing, including how to talk to a hard-of-hearing person. Gently and thoughtfully teaches about being a hard-of-hearing kid.

Penguin Random House Canada page for Can Bears Ski?

The Guardian article about Raymond Antrobus writing Can Bears Ski?
Short film 'Dear Hearing World' from Raymond Antrobus' poetry collection The Perseverence.  Raymond Antrobus in English and Vilma Jackson in British Sign Language. 
 
Our English oddity for April: 

The idea went over like a lead balloon. 
Description: Angela wearing a dark shirt sits in front of a dark blue background.
Another oddity revealed in May!
Angela will offer an explanation in ASL next month. Stay tuned!
 
Wishing you a blessed month of Ramadan

from all of us at Interpreting Consolidated
What's in this issue                      
  1. Deaf History Month: March 13 - April 15, 2021 (English)
  2. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (ASL and English)
  3. Accessible Canada Act (English)
  4. Numbers DVD, from our catalogue "Skin: How much do you have?" (ASL)
  5. St. Patrick's Day Fun Fact (English)
  6. Out There: Non-profit, Health Signs Center (ASL and English)
  7. *New* The IC Book Club (English)
  8. English Oddities (ASL and English)
  9. Volunteering with Special Olympians as an Interpreter (English)
 
Deaf History Month is celebrated from March 13 to April 15 each year. The celebration extends over those dates to honor three special days in deaf education history: April 15, 1817 - America's first public school for the deaf opened. April 8, 1864 - Gallaudet University was founded - the world's first post-secondary institution dedicated to the education for the deaf and hard of hearing. March 13, 1988 - Gallaudet hired its first Deaf president in response to a student-led movement. Want to find out more? How Deaf History Month came about and links to more Deaf history topics https://www.deaf-interpreter.com/the-fascinating-origins-of-deaf-history-month/ Five role models in Deaf history: Shirley Jeanne Allen, EdD; Robert R. Davila, PhD; Eugene Hairston; Juliette Gordon Low; and Audree Norton. https://www.insightintodiversity.com/national-deaf-history-month/
 

The ADA and the Right to Effective Communication

Learn about the importance of the ADA (in ASL).
As a deaf or hard-of-hearing American, do you know your rights for access to communication services in public accommodation spaces? These spaces include not only government offices and agencies but businesses and organizations as well. You have the right to barrier-free access to health care, education, public transportation, police services, and mental health services, among other areas. The right to effective communication is established in the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). Since 2011, state and local governments (Title II) and businesses and non-profit organizations with 15 or more employees (Title III) have been required to provide communication aids and services for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals in the mode that they request. What are your options if the accommodations you have requested have not been provided? The National Association for the Deaf Law and Advocacy Center has prepared many resources, including an advocacy tip sheet, advocacy letters to print and share, and if needed, information on how to file a complaint.  Read our full blog post here.
 
The Accessible Canada Act was enacted in 2019. It recognizes American Sign Language, Quebec Sign Language (Langue des signes québécoise) and Indigenous sign languages as the primary languages of communication used by Deaf people in Canada. Among other goals, it aims to provide barrier-free services and spaces for persons with communication disabilities, and to provide accessible digital content and technologies. The ACA applies in Parliament, Government of Canada agencies, and any private sector entity under federal regulation such as broadcasting and transportation.  
"NOTHING WITHOUT US" The Accessible Canada Act will be implemented in partnership with persons with disabilities and the disability community.
 
- From our catalogue -
 
Skin: How much skin do you have? An excerpt from Pursuit of ASL: Interesting Facts Using Numbers, one of a two-video series by Angela Petrone Stratiy.  
Eloquent native signer Angela Petrone Stratiy's Pursuit of ASL video series published by Interpreting Consolidated enhances fluency in ASL in two areas - Classifiers and Numbers. Pursuit of ASL: Interesting Facts Using Numbers has 35 short passages incorporating ASL numbers within a wide variety of contexts. Using the many different numbering systems in ASL with confidence is fundamental to achieving fluency in the language. Pursuit of ASL: Interesting Facts Using Numbers catalogue page
 
Did you know that New York City has the world's longest-running St. Patrick's Day Parade? Since 1762, NYC's Irish (and Irish for the day) have worn the green on March 17! This year, the format is a Virtual Parade Honor Guard for all the First Responders and Essential Workers who have done so much for so many during the pandemic and 9/11. Check out the details here. https://www.nycstpatricksparade.org/nyc-st-patricks-day-parade-2021/
 
- Out There - Health Signs Center
Health Signs Center: a non profit organization, focused on providing access to all aspects of public health in ASL.
Health Signs Center mission is "to promote and advocate for the health, health equity, and health access for the deaf community, including persons who identify as DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, Hard of Hearing, Late Deafened, and American Sign Language (ASL) users nationwide, by providing direct linguistically and culturally accessible education, advocacy, and resources." TraciAnn Hoglind, founder of Health Signs Center, addresses the continued lack of effective communication in the healthcare industry:
 
English transcript here:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1NizrxVosTLEYVvkeRL7Vv1dnTSO7qvfRXprW7OyDfC0/edit More information available on their website: https://www.healthsignscenter.org/
 
The View from IC is interested in featuring Canadian and American businesses and organizations owned/created/operated by Deaf or hard of hearing persons. Recommendations? Let us know. Or, if you are involved in one of these businesses or organizations and would appreciate some FREE promotion in Out There in a future issue, fill out our form here. Kat will be in touch!
 
 * NEW *   The IC Book Club
Welcome to a new feature - The IC Book Club. Every month we will present a book that gives us an opportunity to learn about others' lived experiences and widen our perspectives. In honour of Women's History Month, we present our first pick - Highway of Tears: A True Story of Racism, Indifference and the Pursuit of Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Canadian journalist Jessica McDiarmid tells the story of some of the more than 1,200 Indigenous women and girls whose disappearances and murders along "The Highway of Tears" - a stretch of Highway 16 between British Columbia and Alberta - went unaddressed for decades. Publishers Weekly says this book is "essential reading for anyone who cares about social injustice." It was a 2020 finalist for the RBC Taylor Prize for Non-Fiction. Publishers Weekly review Simon and Schuster's page for Highway of Tears
 
Our English oddity for March:  Why do tug boats push their barges?  
Scroll down for Angela Petrone Stratiy's ASL rendition.
 
Volunteering with Special Olympians as a Sign Language Interpreter
Kat Vickers, IC's Marketing and Distribution Manager, shares a February 2020 (pre-pandemic) experience coaching and interpreting for Washington state Deaf and hearing Special Olympics athletes in snowboarding.  Read her story on our blog here.
 
Why do tug boats push their barges?  Description: Angela wearing a dark shirt sits in front of a dark blue background.
Our English oddity for April:  How can a 'fat chance' and a 'slim chance' mean the same thing?
Angela will offer an explanation in ASL next month.
 
from all of us at Interpreting Consolidated
Interpreting Consolidated (IC) publishes resources for ASL and interpreting students, interpreters, educators and mentors in the US and Canada.  
We send out The View from IC monthly. Questions? Have an idea for a resource you'd like to see? Just want to say hello? Get in touch with Kat Vickers, Marketing and Distribution Manager. Or just reply to this email! The address will look weird, but it will get to us. If you're not already part of our IC community, please subscribe here. Thanks for reading!

The View from IC - February 2021 - Issue #4

History. It's important. How can we know where we're going if we don't know where we've been? Join us at IC as we read and learn this month. Black History Month is celebrated every February in the USA and in Canada. In recognizing the achievements of Black individuals and communities, Black History Month advances the goal of acknowledging and eliminating systemic racism in American and Canadian society. And from the IC catalogue, the history of interpreting - Legacies and Legends. Scroll down to find out more about Dr. Carolyn Ball's history of interpreter education in the United States.
 
2021 marks the 95th year of Black History Month in the United States. This year, the theme established by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History is The Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity.  In Canada, Black History Month has been celebrated annually since February 1996, thanks to the Ontario Black History Society and to Jean Augustine, the first Black woman elected as an MP, who introduced the idea to Parliament. 2021's theme is The Future is Now.
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has limited the possibilities for in-person attendance at events. But here are some safe ways to celebrate. Listen to a concert, take virtual field trips, participate in online discussions, become a bone marrow donor, or support Black-owned businesses. CNN's Five Ways to Celebrate Black History Month Virtually Check out the Association for the Study of African American History (ASALH).
 
EYE on Entrepreneurs The Legacy Collexion 
Meet Robert Small, the Canadian artist behind 27 years of Black History Month posters
LEGACY 2021: RESILIENCE
The mission of Robert Small's company LEGACY Enterprises (LE) is to use art as a powerful vehicle to educate society about the accomplishments of historic people, to advocate for making school spaces conducive to culturally relevant teaching and for transforming community areas into being reflective of our society.

The LEGACY 2021 poster celebrates resilient African-Canadians who have persevered during difficult times, odds and obstacles. In light of a world-wide pandemic, racial unrest and police brutality, this poster has a message of endurance through hard times.

This year's featured individuals are businessman Denham Jolly, women's advocate Meseret Haileyesus, icon of the labour movement Fred Upshaw, community activist Ekua Walcott, and nurses Beatrice Massop and Clotilda Douglas-Yakimchuk.

A recent graduate of Teachers College from York University, Robert also speaks and presents workshops across the country on the importance of Black History and of culturally-relevant pedagogy in the school system. Purchase the LEGACY 2021: RESILIENCE poster and more artwork and educational resources at https://thelegacycollexion.com/.
 
The View from IC is interested in featuring Canadian and American businesses owned by Deaf or hard of hearing persons. Can you recommend a business? Let us know. Or, if you are a business owner and would appreciate some FREE promotion in EYE on Entrepreneurs in a future issue, fill out our form here. Kat will be in touch!
 
- From our catalogue - How did the interpreter profession come to be? Dr. Carolyn Ball's history of interpreter education has the answer to this question and more.
 
Dr. Carolyn Ball discusses her book "Legacies and Legends: History of Interpreter Education from 1800 to the 21st Century."
English transcript available on IC's blog here. "Legacies and Legends: History of Interpreter Education from 1800 to the 21st Century" answers many questions about the history of interpreter education in the United States.  How did interpreting become a profession? What were the laws that affected Deaf people and the provision of interpreters? Who were the major players in the development of interpreter education? Read more here: Legacies and Legends catalogue page
 
New stamps for Black History Month
Canada Post's 13th stamp issue in their ongoing Black History Month series features two early Black Canadian settlements - Willow Grove, New Brunswick and Amber Valley, Alberta (IC's home province). Read their histories here: https://www.canadapost.ca/blogs/personal/perspectives/new-black-history-month-stamp-issue/ Amber Valley, one of the biggest Black settlements in Western Canada, has a rich history. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/black-settlement-alberta-amber-valley-1.5900836
 
Our English oddity for February:  Why do we park on a driveway and drive on a parkway?  
Scroll down for Angela Petrone Stratiy's ASL rendition.
 
'Trial by Fire' : Sign language interpreters key part of COVID-19 updates  
Edmonton Journal, Dec. 31, 2020 Article by Dylan Short. Photo by ED KAISER / Postmedia Randy Dwizenka and Carla Dupras are the interpreter team relaying the COVID-19 public briefings of Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta's Chief Medical Officer of Health, to the province's deaf community. Alberta's first daily public briefings about the pandemic in March 2020 did not have sign language interpreters. After urging from the deaf community, the province contracted Randy, who is Deaf, and Carla, who is hearing, through Deaf and Hear Alberta. Nearly one year later, Randy and Carla are still at work, providing valuable information about the pandemic to the deaf community. Deaf accessibility advocate Crystal Jones hopes the province sees the value of interpreters going forward and continues to have governmental briefings interpreted for the community. Read Dylan Short's full Edmonton Journal article here  
Thank you to all the interpreters who have been on the front lines  during COVID-19  
 
Why do we park on a driveway and drive on a parkway? Description: Angela wearing a dark shirt sits in front of a dark blue background.
Our English oddity for March:  Why do tug boats push their barges?  
Angela will offer an explanation in ASL next month.
 
from all of us at Interpreting Consolidated
 
Interpreting Consolidated (IC) publishes resources for ASL and interpreting students, interpreters, educators and mentors in the US and Canada.  
We send out The View from IC monthly. Questions? Have an idea for a resource you'd like to see? Just want to say hello? Get in touch with Kat Vickers, Marketing and Distribution Manager. Or just reply to this email! The address will look weird, but it will get to us. If you're not already part of our IC community, please subscribe here. Thanks for reading!

The View from IC - January 2021 - Issue #3

Fluency in ASL is so important for effective interpretations. Where does that foundation in ASL fluency begin? With native signers, teachers, parents, mentors and more.

This month, The View from IC focuses on teaching ASL with Angela Petrone Stratiy.

Interpreting Consolidated (IC) publishes resources for ASL and interpreting students, interpreters, educators and mentors in the US and Canada.  Visit our website ASLinterpreting.com.
Oh, and by the way, if you're not part of our IC community yet...subscribe here.  Didn't receive our previous issues? Read them here.
 
About Angela Petrone Stratiy...

Angela is a native signer with more than 40 years of experience teaching ASL and interpreting. Raised in a Deaf family, she graduated from the Saskatchewan School for the Deaf and went on to complete a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature at Gallaudet and a Master of Education degree in Deaf Education at Western Maryland College (now McDaniel College).

In addition to teaching, Angela uses her expertise in ASL as a Deaf interpreter and a consultant for a variety of educational institutions, organizations and video-relay providers.

Her eloquent ASL is featured on Interpreting Consolidated's video series Pursuit of ASL: Interesting Facts Using Classifiers and Pursuit of ASL: Interesting Facts Using Numbers.

Read more about Angela here.

Her excellent resource 101 Activities for Teaching ASL is featured below.
 
101 Activities for Teaching ASL
 Angela Petrone Stratiy, MEd

This activity book by native signer Angela Petrone Stratiy supports instructors teaching American Sign Language (ASL). Its fun and challenging activities are designed for students of all ages. Most involve interacting with other students, which is a powerful way to practice ASL and to develop confidence in the language. The activities can be used while teaching online, too.

The need for this type of resource is clear, as it has been popular with instructors across North America since its release. Several copies have even made their way to Australia. Teachers there have found that most of the activities can be adapted for teaching AUSLAN.

As our gift to you in this issue, IC is offering two activities from the book as a free download here.

For more about the book in ASL, and specifically these two activities, here is Angela: 
Angela signs about 2 activities from her book, "101 Activities for Teaching ASL." 
 

Sign Language Institute Canada:

Working towards excellence in teaching ASL and LSQ

Sign Language Institute Canada (SLIC) is a national network of professionals striving to excel in higher standards for teaching Sign Language. SLIC certifies teachers and instructors of ASL through the American Sign Language Proficiency Interview (ASLPI) and the American Sign Language Instructors of Canada Evaluation (ASLICE). It provides instructors access to educational resource materials and networking connections with professionals, mentors and the Deaf Community. 

SLIC Director Gary Malkowski says, “SLIC is committed to the continued development of the national certification process and the professional enrichment of teachers of sign languages."

Gary explains SLIC in ASL:

Sign Language Institute Canada (SLIC) Director Gary Malkowski explains his role and involvement with SLIC. 

LSQ (la langue des signes québécoise) proficiency evaluation is now available to all those who want to know their level of proficiency and set learning or development goals. ÉvaLSQ is provided by CB Linguistics Services; more information can be found here.

Unfortunately LSQ SLICE evaluation is not available at this time, but SLIC, in partnership with the Société Culturelle Québécoise des Sourds and LSQ communities across Canada, is working to have LSQ certification implemented within three years.

Celebrating its 30th Anniversary in 2021, SLIC operates under the umbrella of the Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf, a non-profit charitable organization that relies on volunteers, donations, and community partners to provide quality programs and services in communities across Canada. 

Gary urges sign language instructors, interpreters and mentors to purchase an annual membership to support the work of SLIC. The cost is only $25 for individuals and $200 for organizations. Zoom Membership Night events are being held across Canada right now: in Ontario on January 14, 2021, BC on January 25, Newfoundland and Labrador on January 27, Deaf Youth Canada on January 30, and Alberta on February 1. Zoom SLIC Presentation Nights in LSQ communities in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick will be scheduled in Spring 2021. Contact Victoria at info@slicanada.ca for event-specific registration information.

  [For more info on ASLPI and ASLICE, read the full article here]
 
Our English oddities for January: 

Why are a "wise man" and a "wise guy" opposites?

Is it good if a vacuum really sucks?
Angela signs: Why are a "wise man" and a "wise guy" opposites?
Angela signs: Is it good if a vacuum really sucks?
Our English oddity for February:

Why do we drive on a parkway

and park on a driveway?

Can you explain why this is funny in English?

 How about in ASL? Think about it!

ASL example provided next month.

 
 
Congratulations to our authors

on their retirement from distinguished careers

in the field of educational interpreting:


Dr. Leilani Johnson

Dr. Brenda Schick


Dr. Laurie Bolster
In November, 2020, the National Association of Interpreters in Education (NAIE) newsletter celebrated the careers of three retiring instructors, administrators, and researchers who have spent many decades advancing the field of interpreting in educational settings - Dr. Leilani Johnson, Dr. Brenda Schick and Dr. Laurie Bolster.

Leilani, Brenda and Laurie are also three of the five authors of the Interpreting Consolidated publication Complexities in Educational Interpreting: An Investigation into Patterns of Practice.
Leilani J. Johnson, Ed.D., IC/TC, CI, is the architect and former director of the DO IT Center, now the University of Northern Colorado, Department of ASL & Interpreting Studies (ASLIS). Since 1993, Dr. Johnson has been awarded approximately $22M in federal grants and partnership contracts. She was the Principal Investigator for the OSEP award that supported the studies included in the book Complexities in Educational Interpreting: An Investigation into Patterns of Practice, and she continued as the Principal Investigator on the RSA-funded Project CLIMB. Holding RID certification since 1983, she is a recognized author and presenter at state, regional, national, and international conferences. Her most recent research projects focused on educational interpreting, state employment standards for educational interpreters, and two-to-four-year articulation models. In 2016, Dr. Johnson was honored with a perpetual award instituted by the National Association of Interpreters in Education, the Leilani Johnson Leadership Award, and in 2018 she was designated as ASLIS Director Emerita.
Brenda Schick, Ph.D., was most recently a professor and chair of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder. She studies the development of signed and spoken languages as well as its relationship to literacy and cognition in deaf and hard of hearing children. Her work has focused on the development of literacy skills in young Deaf and hard of hearing students, particularly the role of fingerspelling promoting phonological awareness for signing children (funded by IES). She has studied the development of a Theory of Mind in deaf and hard of hearing children and how it relates to language skills (funded by NIH). Dr. Schick is also the co-developer of the Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA). With colleagues, she has published data about the performance skills of interpreters who work in the K-12 setting. She also developed the EIPA Written Test and the website dedicated to K-12 interpreting (www.classroominterpreting.org).
Laurie Bolster, Ph.D., CI/CT most recently taught for the University of Northern Colorado ASL & Interpreting Studies Department. Her dissertation research examined the impact on one group of educational interpreters (EICP graduates) who faced the rapid shift towards the professionalization of the field through the 1990s. During her ten years traveling the state with the Outreach Department of the CDE, Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind, Dr. Bolster developed a focus on strengthening educational interpreters’ capability for delivering high quality interpreting services for deaf and hard of hearing children. Before joining UNC full-time, she did freelance interpreting in the Washington, DC area for 17 years. She is also a returning assistant editor for the 50th anniversary of the Journal of Transpersonal Psychology.

Best wishes on your retirement Leilani, Brenda and Laurie,

from all of us at Interpreting Consolidated!

 
 
First-ever Canada Research Chair

in Deaf Education named

University of Alberta Department of Educational Psychology professor Joanne Weber has been named the first-ever Canada Research Chair in Deaf Education.

“This is very exciting news because this appointment is the result of decades of hard work by the Canadian Deaf communities to secure the recognition of the federal government of the role of American Sign Language (ASL), Langue de Signe Quebecois (LSQ) and Indigenous Sign Languages in the lives of Deaf Canadians.”

Despite current biomedical approaches such as cochlear implants and the provision of sign language interpreters in inclusive education environments, deaf high school graduates are leaving with the median reading and writing levels commensurate with the fourth grade.

“We know now that language acquisition is not only about providing access to sound and sign language but about the provision of language-rich activities that enable deaf children to communicate freely with their peers, teachers and the community at large. Those opportunities are not always available, especially in the higher grades, despite current interventions,” said Weber,

“I want to look at the ways the arts and drama could be used to facilitate language acquisition in both oral English and ASL, and how we can apply that to bilingual education contexts,” said Weber.

[Read the full article here]

 
EYE on Entrepreneurs

Diversity Academy for Interpreters 

 
Diversity Academy for Interpreters, established by Dr. Suzette Garay and Karen Putz, is our featured business of the month!

The Academy provides a safe, brave community and space for interpreters to learn and grow while becoming the best possible interpreter they can be. 

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing BIPOC and diverse professionals who mentor and teach have rich experiences available only here!

Jariatou Sibi shares their experience:

The yearly Diversity Academy membership has been one of the best investments I've made as a professional interpreter. I am delighted to support the diverse curators who make Diversity Academy possible. I've gathered valuable insight and new information with every session I've attended. As a black female interpreter, it has been refreshing and empowering to see BIPOC colleagues presenting on a wide variety of topics which have been largely unavailable up until now.

Diversity Academy has been ahead of the curve as it relates to highlighting BIPOC stories within the interpreting profession. It's "fitting" that this platform was established right before the unprecedented racial reckoning our country and the world was thrust into, after the murder of George Floyd. Companies and individuals found themselves desperately searching for content to better understand diversity on a deeper level. Having already laid the groundwork, Diversity Academy was poised and ready to serve the community eager to learn. 


Power, Privilege, and Oppression (PPO) Continuing Education Units (CEU's) are also available. 

Please visit their website: https://www.thediversityacademy.com/.
The View from IC is interested in featuring Canadian and American businesses owned by Deaf or hard of hearing persons. If you want to see your business in EYE on Entrepreneurs in a future issue, fill out our form here. Kat will be in touch!
 
Questions? Have an idea for a resource you'd like to see? Just want to say hello? Get in touch with Kat Vickers, Marketing and Distribution Manager.

We send out The View from IC monthly. If you have an idea for an article you would like to contribute, contact us here.

If you're not already part of our IC community, please subscribe here. Previous issues can be found here.

Thanks for reading!

 

 

The View from IC - December 2020 - Issue #2

Interpreting Consolidated (IC) publishes resources for ASL and interpreting students, interpreters, educators and mentors in the US and Canada.

Our website ASLinterpreting.com now has more content in ASL and English for our customers who are Deaf and hearing, as well as more detail about our publications and our authors.

This issue focuses on our flagship publication - the book that launched IC nearly 30 years ago - Interpretation Skills: English to ASL.

Read on!
Oh, and by the way, if you're not part of our IC community yet...subscribe here.
 

Why "The Blue Book"?
 
Marty M. Taylor, PhD

Here at Interpreting Consolidated (IC), we call the book that started it all “The Blue Book”. You could say that might be “judging a book by its cover” – it IS blue – but really it is so foundational to our company that we call it simply that. Nearly 30 years have passed since the publication of the first edition of Interpretation Skills: English to American Sign Language.

“What skills do expert interpreters possess?” That is the question that Interpretation Skills: English to ASL answers.

The second edition retains the eight Major Features of the first edition, but identifies a greater number of skills for each feature, more thoroughly defines each skill, and increases the number and detail of Possible Errors with accompanying examples. The book now includes 85 Key Skills with 421 Possible Errors, where previously there were 59 Key Skills with 183 Possible Errors. [Read the full article here]
 
 
Why are a "wise man" and a "wise guy" opposites?

Is it good if a vacuum really sucks?

Can you explain why these are funny in English?

 How about in ASL? Think about it!

ASL examples provided in Issue #3.

 
 

Not all skills are equal:
Knowledge-lean and knowledge-rich skills

From Interpretation Skills: English to American Sign Language, Second Edition by Marty M. Taylor, PhD.

Knowledge-lean skills are those skills that can be learned in a relatively short period of time. For example, most people can learn the manual alphabet in an evening, or a day, or over the course of a few 3-hour classes.

Knowledge-rich skills are those skills that take dedicated practice over extended periods of time to achieve accuracy and fluency. For example, using classifiers and structuring space are rich skills.

Signers and interpreters must have the ability to use both lean skills and rich skills fluently and effectively.  “Lean” skills do not mean they are of little value, or are less important than “rich” skills.   [Read the full article here]
 
Anita Harding, from Gallaudet University, explains in ASL the difference between Knowledge-lean and Knowledge-rich Skills in Marty M. Taylor's book, Interpretation Skills: English to ASL, Second Edition.
 

Interpretation Skills: English to ASL 2nd Edition
by Marty M. Taylor, PhD

Interpretation Skills: English to ASL Companion DVD - Ants
Skills development tool - Analyzing the 8 Major Features in 4 ASL interpretations of a lecture in English

 
 
EYE on Entrepreneurs

AEfron Arts and Culture

 
Our featured entrepreneur this month is Amy Cohen Efron of Atlanta, Georgia. She grew up in New York, and then lived in Washington state while working at the Washington School for the Deaf, and in Florida. While working almost 28 years as a school psychologist, she practiced her self-care through creating art.

Now Amy embarks on a new venture, AEfron Arts and Culture. Here is how Amy describes her business:

AEfron Arts and Culture is about the past, present and future journey of Amy Cohen Efron. Amy was a vlogger/blogger, and CURRENTLY, is an artist/activist. Please join with Amy’s observations of “DEAF WORLD” through her “EYE”, and find out how Amy “SEES IT” through her thought-provoking, provocative, and controversial artworks. I sign, write, and draw openly about everything on my website, and all views are my own. My artworks can be purchased through http://www.etsy.com/shop/AEfronArts.

Amy is also very active in the Deaf Jewish community.  We are so pleased to feature her memories of Hanukkah in The View from IC (see below).
Amy Cohen Efron shares her experience growing up as a Deaf Jewish Woman in New York City. 
The View from IC is interested in featuring Canadian and American businesses owned by Deaf or hard of hearing persons. If you want to see your business in EYE on Entrepreneurs in a future issue, fill out our form here. Kat will be in touch!
 
Learn the reason behind the sign for Kwanzaa from Gallaudet University!
 
Happy Hanukkah! Merry Christmas! Happy Kwanzaa!

Best wishes for a safe and healthy holiday season

from all of us at
 
Questions? Have an idea for a resource you'd like to see? Just want to say hello? Get in touch with Kat Vickers, Marketing and Distribution Manager. Or just reply to this email! The address will look weird, but it will get to us.

We send out The View from IC monthly.

If you're not already part of our IC community, please subscribe here.

Thanks for reading!

-

Welcome

Here at Interpreting Consolidated (IC), we publish resources for ASL and interpreting students, interpreters, educators and mentors in the US and Canada.

Our website ASLinterpreting.com has recently been revamped. More content in ASL and English for our customers who are Deaf and hearing. More detail about our publications and our authors.

Want to know more about IC? Check out founder Dr. Marty Taylor and why she developed the company.

Questions? Have an idea for a resource you'd like to see? Just want to say hello? Get in touch with Marty or Kat Vickers, Marketing and Distribution Manager.

This first issue is coming to you because you opted in to our email list or completed a signup form on our website.

We will be sending out The View from IC monthly.
Can't remember that you signed up? It may have been a few years ago. If you no longer wish to be on our list, no worries - you can unsubscribe here.
Start Your Own Business

Self-employment support is available
As a Deaf or hard of hearing person, "if you have not found the job you want with a company, there are different paths to explore other than employment, which may range from becoming a business owner to being an independent contractor (freelance) as a solution.  According to the U.S. Department of Labor, employed persons with a disability were more likely to be self-employed than those with no disability."

The above quote is from an article on the National Association of the Deaf NERC website (National Employment Resource Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing). It includes many helpful links to resources to get your business idea off the ground. See the full article and video here.

If you live in Canada, here are some helpful links:

The View from IC would love to feature Canadian and American businesses owned by Deaf or hard of hearing persons. If you want to see your business in a future issue, fill out our form here. Kat will be in touch!
 
From Our Catalogue

Complexities in Educational Interpreting
reviewed in the Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
This book came about from the University of Northern Colorado's five-year study into educational interpreting practices for deaf and hard of hearing students. It found that equal access to educational interpreting services for K-12 students across all 50 states does not exist, despite years of substantiated need.

In addition to reporting the multi-faceted findings of the study, the book outlines a blueprint for meaningful change.

The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education (July 2020) says that this book is "a must-read for any stakeholder interested in improving the practice and profession of educational interpreters." 

Read the review

Find out more about this book
Buy the book
Deaf Politician: The Gary Malkowski Story

How in the world did a Deaf guy become an elected politician?
"How in the world did a Deaf guy become an elected politician?” That’s the question almost everyone has when they meet Canadian Gary Malkowski and learn that he served as an MPP in the province of Ontario in the 1990s.
 
To commemorate the 30th anniversary of his election, the biography Deaf Politician – The Gary Malkowski Story by Richard Medugno is now in large print paperback and as an ebook on Amazon.
 
Deaf Politician follows Gary from being born deaf into an immigrant, working-class family in Hamilton, Ontario through his education at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC, to his community activism in Canada and political career in Toronto. Read more here.

After many years with the Canadian Hearing Society, Gary is now the Director of Sign Language Institute Canada, a national network of professionals striving to excel in higher standards for teaching Sign Language. SLIC certifies teachers and instructors of ASL/LSQ (la langue des signes québécoise) in Canada.

There will be more about the work of SLIC in a future newsletter.
Thanks for reading!
Subscribe to The View from IC
Copyright © 2020 Interpreting Consolidated, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:

Interpreting Consolidated

PO Box 203 Stn Main

Edmonton, AB T5J 2J1

Canada

Or

Interpreting Consolidated

PO Box 555

Kelso, WA 98626

Add us to your address book